10 Notable Distinctions Between Send and Sent with Examples – Send and Sent Differences

Filed in Articles by on July 12, 2021 0 Comments

Send and Sent Differences – Send and Sent are two different tenses of the same verb and that is ‘send’. A verb refers to a word that states or asserts something about a person or a thing. A verb may tell us about what a person or thing is, what the person or the thing does and what is done to a person or thing. Verbs are fundamental building blocks of a sentence or phrase, telling a story about what is taking place.

Send and Sent Differences

10 Notable Distinctions Between Send and Sent with Examples - Send and Sent Differences

Send

The word “send” is defined as “cause to go or be taken to a particular destination.” It is synonymous with the words: transmit, convey, dispatch, transport, yield, deliver, direct, remit, mail, or Forward.

The verb “send” is frequently used in the world of sport. To ‘send it’ means to not be overly critical and go insanely big. Etymologically, the word has a Proto-Germanic origin with the original word being “sandijanan” which directly interprets as “go” or “journey.”

The verb was then absorbed into Old English as the word “sendan”.  The Old English word means “send, throw,” or “send forth.”

The continuous tense and future continuous tense of the word ‘send’ is “sending.” The continuous tense indicates that the action is in progress, and the future continuous tense implies that the action is in progress at the moment and is still to take in the future.

Example:

  1. Please send my brother the parcel.
  2. I send him a snack every day.
  3. Send my best wishes to your mum and sisters.
  4. I will send you a doll.
  5. What phone should I send?
  6. Will you send me a laptop?
  7. Bright always sends me a text
  8. Please send me a striped tie.
  9. Can I send you a clip?
  10. I will send you a car.

Sent

The verb “Sent” is the past tense of the word ‘Send’. It doubles as both the past simple tense and past participle tense of the word as well as its past progressive tense and past perfect progressive tense.

The past tense “Sent” implies that the action in question has already taken place. Sent is to be used after you’ve started or ended the action.

Example:

  1. I have sent your brother the parcel.
  2. His snack has been sent.
  3. I sent my wishes to your mum and sisters
  4. I had sent you a doll.
  5. Where is the phone I sent you?
  6. Who bought the laptop you sent?
  7. Bright sent you a text through the month.
  8. Did you send me a striped tie?
  9. Where is the clip she sent?
  10. I sent her the car as promised.

Notable Distinctions Between ‘Send’ and ‘Sent’

1. The word ‘send’ is a verb that means ‘to cause to go or to be taken somewhere’ while the word ‘sent’ is a conjugation of the verb ‘send.’

2. ‘Send’ generally interprets as an instruction to send. ‘Sent’ implies that the object has been sent and assumed to have arrived

3. The word ‘send’ is the present perfect tense of the verb while the word ‘sent’ is the past tense and past participle tense of the verb.

4. Both ‘Send’ and ‘Sent’ have progressive forms. Although, the word ‘send’ is used in its present form and the word ‘sent’ in its past form.

5. ‘Send’ can be used as a command or as an infinitive while ‘Sent’ can’t be used as a command.

6. ‘Sent’ can be used as an adjective and as part of the passive voice while the contrary is the case of ‘Send’.

7. ‘Send’ is simply the present tense of the verb. ‘Sent’ is past tense and past progressive tense.

8. ‘Send’ is to be used before you complete or begin the action. ‘Sent’ is to be used after you’ve started or ended the action.

9. Send and sent represent different tenses of the same verb.

10. “Send” is an irregular verb; that’s why instead of adding “ed” to form its past tense, it changes its spelling to form the word “sent.”

Thanks for taking the time to invest in your vocabulary. Hope you find it interesting and useful. If you have comments, questions or just want to discuss, do not hesitate to leave a comment. Use the share buttons below to share this information with your friends on Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, and other social platforms.

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